HEARING LOSS SAMPLER

Scott Bradley, Ph.D.

University of Wisconsin-Whitewater

bradleys@uww.edu

These are simulations of common types of hearing losses. Most clips do not account for recruitment or cochlear disortion. If you have any suggestions or experience problems with the web site, don't hesitate in contacting me. Feel free to use these samples and clips for non-commericial purposes. Updated 12/30/07.

Normal Hearing. Use these clips to set the volume on your computer.

Speech in Quiet

Speech in Noise

 
 
 

Noise Induced Hearing Loss

Mild High Frequency

Speech in Quiet

Speech in Noise

   

Noise Induced Hearing Loss

Moderately-Severe High Frequency

Speech in Quiet

Speech in Noise

   

Presbycusis. Age Related Hearing Loss

Mild

Speech in Quiet

Speech in Noise

   

Presbycusis. Age Related Hearing Loss

Moderate

Speech in Quiet

Speech in Noise (note: you will definitely have difficulty hearing this clip)

   

Rising Configuration. Similar to what you would find with otosclerosis.

Speech in Quiet

Speech in Noise

   

Mild. Similar to what you would find with otitis media.

Speech in Quiet

Speech in Noise

   

Mid Frequency

Speech in Quiet

Speech in Noise

   

Profound Hearing Loss with Residual Low Frequency Hearing. Most profound hearing losses do not have this much resdidual hearing. For this clip the amplitude is increased to simulate an extended low frequency hearing aid.

Speech in Quiet

Other  

Example of No Recruitment

Example of Recruitment (notice that the rate of amplfiication rises at a much faster rate than the 'No Recruitment' sample).

 

Cochlear Distortion (phonemic regression). Notice as the speech becomes louder it does not become more intelligible.

 

Wireless FM (Auditory Trainer)

 

Cochlear Implant and Auditory Neuropathy (this is a link to Dr. Phil Loizou's site at UT-Dallas)